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Drug Abuse in the U.S.

From opioids to heroin, drugs have become a huge problem in the United States. This guide provides information about the most common culprits, including the harmful, and potentially fatal, effects of drug abuse and addiction.

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From opioids to heroin, drugs have become a huge problem in the United States. This guide provides information about the most common culprits, including the harmful, and potentially fatal, effects of drug abuse and addiction.

5 Exercises for Better Balance

Having good balance can help you avoid acute injuries (like hurting yourself in a fall) and chronic ones (overuse injuries such as tendonitis). Try these stability and strength exercises to achieve a more balanced body.

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These stability and strength exercises can help you achieve a more balanced body — and prevent a host of injuries.

So Much Sodium

Americans eat a lot of sodium, and too much can lead to high blood pressure. See how much sodium is in some of your favorite foods, and learn how you can trim extra salt from your daily diet.

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Americans eat a lot of sodium. Learn how much salt should be part of your daily diet, and how to cut back for better health.

Too Much Noise?

From headphones to hair dryers to heavy city traffic, learn about common noises that could put you at risk for permanent hearing loss if you don't take precautions or turn down the volume.

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From headphones to hair dryers to heavy city traffic, learn about common noises that could put you at risk for permanent hearing loss.

Facts About Disabilities

The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA), signed into law in 1990, protects people with disabilities from discrimination. Learn more about the ADA and the definition of a disability, which can affect many aspects of a person's life.

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The Americans With Disabilities Act, signed into law by President George H.W. Bush in 1990, protects people with disabilities from discrimination. Learn more about the Americans With Disabilities Act and the definition of a disability, which can affect many aspects of someone's life.

Boost Your Brain Health

Do you have the power to prevent Alzheimer's disease? While some risk factors are beyond your control, there are things you can do that may help protect against Alzheimer's, from staying fit to having a purpose in life.

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Use this guide to make lifestyle changes that may help reduce your risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. 

Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby

Baby's on the way! As a mom-to-be, you are making choices every day that can profoundly affect what's happening inside the womb.

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Baby's on the way! And while a little one's growing inside, a lot is happening outside. Families are discussing names, organizing a nursery, and stockpiling diapers and tiny onesies. All those activities are important — not to mention fun. Meanwhile, mom is making choices that can profoundly affect what's happening inside the womb. "Many of the things that are healthy during pregnancy are things women can control," Allison Chen-McCracken, MD, an OB-GYN with Rush University Medical Center, says. "And as they prepare to bring a new life into the outside world, that's very empowering." Chen-McCracken offers insight into just how much certain choices matter. Here are just a few: SAY YES TO WHY REDUCING STRESS High levels of stress can increase the chances of having an underweight baby who is at risk for respiratory, heart, intestinal and eye problems. Although researchers are still investigating why, stress during pregnancy may also be linked to behavioral concerns during the child's adolescence. EXERCISING Exercise helps reduce stress — and gives moms stamina for the challenge of labor and delivery. Women who maintain fitness during pregnancy typically do better during the pushing process. A FLU SHOT Nature suppresses a pregnant woman's immune system to make sure it doesn’t attack the baby. But that makes her more susceptible to infections. Expectant moms who get the flu can end up being hospitalized. Since flu season can last until May, a flu shot anytime during winter is a good idea. SAY NO TO WHY SMOKING Among many other negatives, smoking can cause the placenta — the source of the baby's food and oxygen during pregnancy — to separate from the womb too early, causing bleeding, which is dangerous to the mother and baby. Babies born to women who smoke are also at higher risk of having a cleft lip or cleft palate. DELI MEATS If deli meats aren't kept cold enough at a store or restaurant, they can become contaminated with a bacteria called listeria. Pregnant women are at particularly high risk for getting sick from listeria, which can cause miscarriage or stillbirth. CERTAIN FISH Raw fish can carry foodborne pathogens, so take sushi off the menu. And because fetuses exposed to mercury are at risk for birth defects, avoid fish that are high in mercury. That includes king mackerel and swordfish. Meanwhile, it’s healthy to eat cooked salmon or tuna once or twice a week.  

Heart Healthy Diet

Keeping your heart going strong is essential to your health. And one of the best ways to prevent heart disease is by adhering to a heart healthy diet. Learn which foods are heart healthy, which to avoid and which are OK in moderation.

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A cardiologist at Rush offers advice to help you enjoy a heart healthy diet, including which foods to highlight, which to avoid and which are OK in moderation.  

Know Your Stroke Symptoms

When someone is having a stroke, the longer it takes to get treatment, the more brain damage can occur. Knowing the signs of a stroke will enable you to get to the hospital more quickly for life-saving medical attention. 

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Take a few moments to learn the symptoms of stroke. Knowing these symptoms can save lives — including yours — by enabling you to get life-saving medical attention more quickly.     

Cold or Allergy?

You can't stop sneezing and your eyes are red and watery. Are you coming down with a cold, or is it an allergy? With so many symptoms in common, it can be hard to tell, but there are differences between the two. 

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It can be difficult to distinguish between a cold and allergies. Use this handy guide to figure out what's causing your symptoms.

Cold or Flu?

While a cold and the flu are both viruses and share many symptoms, there are some key differences, including how quickly symptoms first appear. This infographic can help you figure out what's making you sick.

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You're feeling lousy, but do you simply have a cold? Or is it the flu? This infographic can help you figure out what's causing your symptoms.  

Health Through the Ages

Scientists may someday learn to control the aging process. Until they do, the responsibility for aging well rests largely in your hands — and relies mostly on healthy behaviors. These tips will help you stay physically and mentally fit as you age.

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Follow these tips on nutrition, exercise, screenings and more to keep yourself physically and mentally fit as you age.  

Strengthen Your Core

A weak core can contribute to many different problems, including back, hip and knee pain. This infographic features exercises to help make your core stronger, which will go a long way toward preventing injuries.

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Give these exercises a try to help build a stronger core and protect yourself from injuries.  

What Is a Healthy Weight?

What's the best way to determine a healthy weight? Find out what your body mass index is by using our handy interactive BMI calculator, or use our height-weight chart to help you stay within the recommended range.

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What's the best way to determine a healthy weight? You can find out what your body mass index is by using the interactive BMI calculator, or you can look at your height and weight in the chart below. Determining your body mass index (function() { var s = document.createElement("script"); s.type = "text/javascript"; s.async = true; s.src="https://dga21imkwkpb7.cloudfront.net/resizer.js"; (document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0] || document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0]).appendChild(s); })(); What is body mass index? Determining how much you should weigh is not a simple matter of looking at a height-weight chart, but includes considering the amount of bone, muscle and fat in your body's composition. The amount of fat is the critical measurement. A good indicator of how much fat you carry is the body mass index (BMI). Although it is not a perfect measure, it gives a fairly accurate assessment of how much of your body is composed of fat. How can I tell if I'm overweight? Use the tool at right to calculate your BMI. Having a BMI higher than 24.9 may mean you are overweight. Note that these are approximate values, and they are intended to be used only as a rough guide. If you are worried about your BMI or are trying to lose weight, talk to your primary care doctor. You may also wish to contact the Rush Center for Weight Loss and Lifestyle Medicine, which offers individualized weight loss and wellness programs for people of all ages. You may also contact the Rush Nutrition and Wellness Center or the Rush University Prevention Center. These programs offer nutrition counseling and help with making lifestyle changes. Doctors at Rush offer bariatric surgery for some people who are morbidly obese (those with a BMI of at least 40, or a BMI of at least 35 plus an obesity-related disease such as diabetes or high blood pressure). Height and Weight Chart table.tableizer-table {border: 1px solid #CCC; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-seriffont-size: 12px;} .tableizer-table td {align:right; padding: 4px; width: 750px; margin: 3px;border: 1px solid #ccc;}.tableizer-table th {background-color: #669999; color: #FFF;font-weight: bold;} Height Weight   Normal Overweight Obese 4' 10" 91 to 118 lbs. 119 to 142 lbs. 143 to 186 lbs. 4' 11" 94 to 123 lbs. 124 to 147 lbs. 148 to 193 lbs. 5' 97 to 127 lbs. 128 to 152 lbs. 153 to 199 lbs. 5' 1" 100 to 131 lbs. 132 to 157 lbs. 158 to 206 lbs. 5' 2" 104 to 135 lbs. 136 to 163 lbs. 164 to 213 lbs. 5' 3" 107 to 140 lbs. 141 to 168 lbs. 169 to 220 lbs. 5' 4" 110 to 144 lbs. 145 to 173 lbs. 174 to 227 lbs. 5' 5" 114 to 149 lbs. 150 to 179 lbs. 180 to 234 lbs. 5' 6" 118 to 154 lbs. 155 to 185 lbs. 186 to 241 lbs. 5' 7" 121 to 158 lbs. 159 to 190 lbs. 191 to 249 lbs. 5' 8" 125 to 163 lbs. 164 to 196 lbs. 197 to 256 lbs. 5' 9" 128 to 168 lbs. 169 to 202 lbs. 203 to 263 lbs. 5' 10" 132 to 173 lbs. 174 to 208 lbs. 209 to 271 lbs. 5' 11" 136 to 178 lbs. 179 to 214 lbs. 215 to 279 lbs. 6' 140 to 183 lbs. 184 to 220 lbs. 221 to 287 lbs. 6' 1" 144 to 188 lbs. 189 to 226 lbs. 227 to 295 lbs. 6' 2" 148 to 193 lbs. 194 to 232 lbs. 233 to 303 lbs. 6' 3" 152 to 199 lbs. 200 to 239 lbs. 240 to 311 lbs. 6' 4" 156 to 204 lbs. 205 to 245 lbs. 246 to 320 lbs. BMI 19 to 24 25 to 29 30 to 39 Source: National Institutes of Health. Don't see your weight? Learn more.

What's in Your Medicine Cabinet?

Having the right supplies handy when you're sick or hurt can help you mend more quickly. This infographic shows which first-aid supplies and over-the-counter remedies your medicine cabinet should have — and which things it shouldn't.

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Learn which first-aid supplies and over-the-counter remedies your medicine cabinet should have — and which things it shouldn't.  

RICE for Small Injuries

The next time you're sidelined by a minor injury, try treating it with RICE — rest, ice, compression and elevation. RICE therapy is the fastest way to relieve pain and reduce swelling from minor injuries. 

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Learn how RICE can help you get back on your feet after a minor injury.  

Important Heart Health Numbers

Heart health is a numbers game. Numbers, along with your family history, offer physicians the biggest clues about your heart disease risk. This infographic provides target numbers for the key risk factors related to heart health.

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From blood pressure to BMI, these numbers add up to a healthy heart.  

Exercise Guide

Exercise is one of the keys to good health, from strengthening your heart, lungs and bones to preventing certain cancers. But do you know how much exercise you should be getting — and which types are most beneficial? 

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This handy exercise guide can help you set — and reach — your daily and weekly physical activity goals.    

The ABCDEs of Skin Cancer Detection

Many people have moles, and often, there's no need to worry. But moles can raise your risk of melanoma — especially if you have a lot of moles and a family history of melanoma. Find out if your moles should be looked at by a doctor.

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Learn whether your moles are harmless or should be checked out by a doctor.