Laryngopharyngeal Reflux (LPR)

LPR, also known as silent reflux, can be irritating. Our expert physicians can soothe your throat with a diet and treatment plan so you can enjoy life again.

LPR, also known as silent reflux, can be irritating. Our expert physicians can soothe your throat with a diet and treatment plan so you can enjoy life again.

LPR, also known as silent reflux, can be irritating. Our expert physicians can soothe your throat with a diet and treatment plan so you can enjoy life again.

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs when stomach acid and enzymes travel back up your esophagus from your stomach to your lower throat. If you have LPR, you may also have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Signs You Should Get Help for LPR

You should go to a doctor if you have the following symptoms of LPR:

  • Chronic cough that wakes you up at night
  • Chronic sore throat
  • Frequent throat-clearing, especially during or after a meal
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Feeling a lump in your throat
  • Hoarseness

LPR Care at Rush

LPR requires a team approach that starts with a visit to a gastroenterologist.

At Rush, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, general surgeons and other specialists work together to develop the best treatment plan for your LPR. This means you benefit from the expertise of multiple specialties who understand how to manage your symptoms.

Our team uses pH testing to help us create a care plan that's specific to you. Your plan may involve the following:

  • Diet and lifestyle changes to help reduce your symptoms
  • Medication to control your acid
  • Speech therapy if your LPR is affecting your voice
  • Laparoscopic surgery called Nissen fundoplication if your LPR is severe (during this procedure, a surgeon wraps part of your stomach around the lower part of your esophagus to keep acid from leaking back up)

Rush Excellence in Laryngopharyngeal Reflux (LPR) Care

  • Quick access to experts close to you: Our doctors can often see you within one week of your request. You can meet with us in-person at Rush locations in Chicago and the suburbs and even virtually through telemedicine.
  • A coordinated approach to care: At Rush, gastroenterologists work together with specialists in voice, airway and swallowing disorders to provide multidisciplinary treatment to relieve your LPR symptoms.
  • Minimally invasive options: If you require surgery for LPR, you don't have to worry about having large incisions. Our surgeons are skilled in laparoscopic and robotic techniques that can reduce pain and scarring, and get you back to your normal routine more quickly.
  • National experts who partner with you on your care: When you see a doctor at Rush for LPR, you are an important part of your care team. This patient-centered approach is one reason why U.S. News & World Report ranked Rush University Medical Center as among the best in the nation for gastroenterology and GI surgery.
Testimonials

My overall philosophy is basically to communicate and treat patients the way that I would want to be — or my family members would want to be — treated.

Rana Abraham, MD, Gastroenterologist