The COSMID Study for Patients with Diverticulitis

Clinical Trial Title

Comparison of surgery and medicine on the impact of diverticulitis (COSMID) trial.

National Clinical Trial Number:

04095663

Clinical Trial Protocol Description:

The COSMID (Comparison of Surgery and Medicine on the Impact of Diverticulitis) trial is a pragmatic, patient-level randomized superiority trial of elective colectomy vs. best medical management for patients with quality of life (QoL) limiting diverticular disease. A parallel observational cohort will include those who are disinclined to have their treatment choice randomized, but are willing to contribute information about their outcomes. The goal of the COSMID trial is to answer the question: For patients with QoL-limiting diverticular disease, is elective colectomy more effective than best medical management? The hypothesis being tested in the COSMID trial is that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) among patients in the surgery arm will be superior to those in the best medical management arm.

Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria:

In order to participate you must meet the following criteria:

  • Are at least 18 years of age.
  • Have had at least one episode of diverticulitis confirmed by CT scan in last 5 years and a colonoscopy to rule out or screen for other colon pathology concordant with screening guidelines.
  • Have a history of recurrent uncomplicated diverticulitis without current symptoms (AUD in remission) over the prior 5 year.
  • Have persistent signs, symptoms, and concerns related to diverticular disease ≥ 3 months after recovery from an episode of AUD (e.g., excluding irritable bowel syndrome and other conditions in coordination with gastroenterologist).

This is a partial list of eligibility requirements. To inquire about your eligibility, please call the contact number provided. If you wish to inquire via email, please include the title of the study in your message.

Study Details

Clinical Trial Investigator

Dana Hayden, MD

Contact Information

Matthew Johnson