Our Team

Directors

Amanda Bradke

Amanda Bradke, MD, is one of the medical directors of the Center to Transform Health and Housing and an assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at Rush University Medical Center. Her main clinical role at Rush is in the Department of Hospitalist Medicine, and she additionally provides clinical care in multiple homeless shelters that have partnered with Rush. She recently obtained her X-Waiver to prescribe buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid use disorders and has completed the Rush Opiate Use Disorder Treatment Fellowship ECHO Program. Bradke is passionate about providing accessible medication-assisted recovery services to those who are experiencing homelessness or housing insecurity. Outside of her work with the Center, she engages in additional health equity work through her role as assistant director of Global and Community Health Programs in the Department of Internal Medicine, where she directs the Internal Medicine (IM) Resident Global Health elective and codirects the IM Global Health fellowship. She also chairs the Health Equity Anti-Racism Transforming subcommittee at Rush and has founded and co-chairs the Chicago Coalition for Anti-Racism and Equity in Health. Both groups address race-based clinical decision tools that perpetuate racism and exacerbate health care disparities at Rush and across the Chicago area.

Bradke received her bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Michigan and her master’s degree in bioethics from the University of Pittsburgh before attending medical school at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. She then went on to complete her internal medicine residency at Boston Medical Center and a global health fellowship through the Health, Equity, Action, Leadership initiative at the University of California San Francisco. During this fellowship, she lived half-time on the Navajo Reservation in Fort Defiance, Arizona, working in primary care, and half-time in rural Haiti working as a hospitalist. She is completing a second master’s degree in global health policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.


Karen Lui

Karen Lui, MD, FAAP, is one of the medical codirectors for the Center to Transform Health and Housing and an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Rush University Medical Center. She is also the medical codirector for the Kids Shelter Health Improvement Program (KidsSHIP), a pediatric shelter outreach program founded in 1996. This program enables four general pediatricians the time needed to provide medical care to children living in one of several homeless shelters located in the West, North and South sides of Chicago. Lui is a leader in the Illinois Community Advocacy Network for Kids in conjunction with her work with the Illinois Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (ICAAP). She is a pediatric champion for ICAAP’s First Steps: Improving Child Health and Housing initiative.

She is a general pediatrician at the Rush Pediatric Primary Care Center, the largest academic pediatric clinic in Chicago, which largely serves the children in Chicago’s West and South sides. Her primary teaching responsibilities are within the pediatric residency program as a preceptor for the resident continuity clinic, the acute care clinic and the general care nursery. In addition, she is the director for resident advocacy rotation and codirector for the longitudinal advocacy track, Kids Community Advocacy at Rush for Equity (KidsCARE). Lui received her bachelor of arts at the University of Chicago in biology and economics. She earned her medical degree at Rush University Medical College and completed her pediatric training at Rush University Children’s Hospital.


Laura Pabalan

Laura Pabalan, MD, FAAP, is one of the medical directors of the Center to Transform Health and Housing and an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Rush University Medical Center. In addition, she is the codirector of the KidsSHIP program and a codirector of the pediatric residency advocacy track, KidsCARE. Most of her work involves taking care of the underserved pediatric population at Rush Pediatric Primary Care Center. Through the work of KidsSHIP, part of her clinical time is spent taking care of children within homeless and domestic violence shelters to help alleviate the transportation barrier to health care. She is an active member of ICAAP’s homelessness initiative, First Steps: Improving Child Health and Housing, which aims to prevent and mitigate child health risks associated with housing insecurity with a specific focus on pregnant persons and children ages zero to six. Pabalan is the pediatric lead in developing and instituting a screening process for the social determinants of health within the outpatient pediatric clinics at Rush University, helping to address the social needs that affect a patient’s health. She went to medical school at the University of Florida’s College of Medicine and completed her pediatrics residency at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.


Therese Gallagher

Terry Gallagher, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, CNL, is director of nursing for the Center to Transform Health and Housing, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Rush University and a family nurse practitioner in the Office of Faculty Practice at Rush University’s College of Nursing. Gallagher founded the Sue Gin Health Center at Oakley Square apartments, a free clinic within an affordable housing development on the West Side of Chicago. She has overseen the health center’s expansion. During the pandemic, Gallagher founded CARReS, a medical respite isolation facility for people with COVID-19 and housing instability and a partnership among Rush, the Chicago Department of Public Health and A Safe Haven. Gallagher has a bachelor of arts in history, a master of science from the University of Illinois Chicago, a master of science in nursing from DePaul University and a doctor of nursing practice from Rush University.

Clinical Team

Adriana Romero

Adriana Romero, DO, is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Rush University Medical Center. Romero primarily works in the Rush North Riverside clinic, caring for a largely Latino population. When she is not in clinic, she is involved in the pediatric homeless shelter outreach program, KidsSHIP (Kids Shelter Health Improvement Program), during which she provides comprehensive medical care to children experiencing homelessness. Romero has also been working closely with a medical student fellow to develop ASPIRE, a program for adolescents and young adults living in homeless shelters. The goal of ASPIRE is to provide information, including career readiness, success coaching, sexual health and mental health, to help adolescents and young adults succeed in their transition out of the shelters. Romero went to medical school at Midwestern University Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago.


James Rhode

James Rohde, LCSW, is a trained social worker in Rush’s Department of Social Work and Community Health, working in partnership with Heartland Alliance Health (HAH). He spends time each week at shelters throughout the city, serving HAH’s shelter-based service team. Rohde works with residents of these shelters to address their mental health needs and assists with phone calls to the Department of Social Work and Community Health’s hotline. For many years, he worked as a case manager on the Southwest Side of Chicago and at local YMCAs serving individuals experiencing homelessness, assisting them with housing and helping them gain identification, food, clothes, public benefits, medical and psychiatric appointments, and rehabilitation. He graduated from Loyola University Chicago's School of Social Work, where he earned his LCSW in 2009. Rohde and his wife have been AmeriCorps volunteers in St. Louis and have taught life skills classes to people with developmental disabilities.


Vikram Nandhan

Vikram Nandhan, MD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Rush University Medical Center. In addition, he is a physician in KidsSHIP, Kids Shelter Health Improvement program. The majority of Nandhan's work is spent taking care of the underserved pediatric population of the Rush Pediatric Primary Care Center. Through KidsSHIP, part of his clinical time is providing medical care for children recovering from trauma, abuse and neglect. In his role in the medical school, he is an assistant clerkship director for pediatrics at Rush Medical Center and serves as an advisor for medical students. He trains students and resident physicians in the care of underserved youth so they may carry on this work in the years to come. Nandhan went to medical school at Rush Medical College and completed his residency at Rush University Children’s Hospital.

Managers

Elizabeth Cummings

Social Care Manager - Elizabeth (Lizzi) Cummings, MSW, LCSW, serves as the social care manager for the Center to Transform Health and Housing at Rush University Medical Center. She is also the manager of clinical excellence and training within the Department of Social Work and Community Health at Rush University Medical Center and is the lead of hospital integration at the Center for Health and Social Care Integration (CHaSCI), where she provides clinical and training support to health systems and community-based organizations across the nation as they implement CHaSCI care models. Cummings also provides technical assistance within the Rush Center for Excellence in Aging.

In addition to her work at Rush, she serves on Access Living’s Young Professionals Council, which engages the community to join the movement toward inclusion and independence for people with disabilities, and she is secretary for the Society for Social Work Leadership in Health Care-Illinois Chapter. Cummings holds a master of social work degree from DePaul University and a bachelor of arts in psychology from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana.


Eugenia Olison

Project Manager - Eugenia Olison, M.Ed, LPC, serves as the program manager for the Center to Transform Health and Housing at Rush University Medical Center. Through the Center, Olison works to promote the intersectoral development of strategic collaborations to address inequities in health care and to increase positive health outcomes while advocating for people experiencing homelessness. Previously, Olison served as a member of the Resident-Centered Change Management Team and held the position of senior community life manager at Community Builders, a nonprofit housing developer that creates and strengthens affordable housing infrastructure. She has more than 15 years of experience working to provide leadership in partnership with local service providers and community stakeholders to increase opportunities, particularly in the areas of housing stability, health and wellness. In her efforts to decrease food insecurity and improve health outcomes, Olison has enhanced access to and enrollment in public benefits among underserved populations in Chicago Public Schools. She is a licensed professional counselor in Illinois, holds a bachelor of science degree in human development and family studies from the University of Illinois and has a master of education degree in family and young child counseling from DePaul University.

Executive Sponsors

David Ansell

David Ansell, MD, MPH, is the Michael E. Kelly Presidential Professor of Internal Medicine and senior vice president/associate provost for community health equity at Rush University Medical Center. He is a 1978 graduate of the State University of New York Upstate Medical College, and he did his medical training at Cook County Hospital. He spent 13 years at Cook County Hospital as an attending physician and ultimately was appointed the chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine there. From 1995 to 2005, he was chairman of internal medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center. Ansell was recruited to Rush University Medical Center as its inaugural chief medical officer in 2005, a position he held until 2015. His research and advocacy have focused on eliminating health inequities. In 2011 he published a memoir of his times at Cook County Hospital, County: Life, Death and Politics at Chicago’s Public Hospital. His latest book is 2017's The Death Gap: How Inequality Kills.


Elizabeth Davis

Elizabeth Davis, MD, is the medical director for Community Health Equity at Rush and one of the founding members of the Center to Transform Health and Housing. She is experienced in building innovative models of care for complex patients. She has had leadership roles in complex care management and care coordination programs both at Rush University Medical Center and San Francisco Health Network. She has presented and written about implementation and outcomes of complex care programs at national conferences. Davis has also studied patient perspectives on health care using both quantitative and qualitative methods. She has served on Institute for Healthcare Improvement, National Quality Forum, California Association of Public Hospitals, and San Francisco Department of Public Health committees focused on case management, care transitions, interdisciplinary practice and medical education.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Davis has worked with Rush leaders to rapidly launch programs to provide testing to people in the community who otherwise did not have access to testing, including in homeless shelters and other congregate settings. These teams started vaccinating as well as soon as vaccines became available. She was invited to speak at a mayoral press conference and has spoken nationally about this work.

Davis has led the creation and growth of the Health Equity and Social Justice Program in Rush Medical School and the Health Equity Track in the Rush Internal Medicine Program. Prior to coming to Rush, she was a faculty member at the University of California, San Francisco, where she taught learners about complex care, health equity and quality improvement.


Robyn Golden

Robyn Golden serves as associate vice president of social work and community health and is chair of the Department of Social Work at Rush University Medical Center. She is also codirector of Rush’s Center for Excellence in Aging and the Center for Health and Social Care Integration. Golden serves as the principal investigator for Rush’s Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program and codirects the Rush Center of Excellence for Behavioral Health Disparities in Aging. Her faculty appointments are in nursing, medicine, psychiatry and health systems management.

For more than 35 years, Golden has been actively involved in service provision, program development, interprofessional education, research and public policy aimed at developing innovative initiatives and systems integration to improve health and well-being. In 2003 and 2004, she was the John Heinz Senate Fellow for Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, and she is a past chair of the American Society on Aging. In 2017, she received the Gerontological Society of America's Maxwell A. Pollack Award for Productive Aging, and she recently served as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine committee studying the integration of social needs care into the delivery of health care. She is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare and is a National Association of Social Workers Social Work Pioneer. Golden holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from Miami University.


Angela Moss

Angela Moss, PhD, MSN, APRN-BC, RN, FAAN, is assistant dean of Faculty Practice Patient Care and Consulting Services and assistant professor in the Department of Community Systems and Mental Health Nursing. She has more than 20 years of experience as a nurse, nurse practitioner, educator and administrator. As assistant dean, Moss is responsible for the development, maintenance and financial sustainability of more than 20 diverse academic-practice partnerships in alignment with the college’s core teaching mission and social justice vision.

She is an expert in the strategic development of self-sustaining nurse-managed care delivery models within communities and built environments. Under her leadership, Rush’s Faculty Practice Patient Care and Consulting Services, where more than 60 faculty clinicians provide nursing care to Chicago’s most vulnerable populations, has grown by more than 550% in the last four years. Rush students contribute over 30,000 annual clinical training hours in the faculty practice program and, as a result, develop specialized clinical skills to care for vulnerable patient populations.

Moss is a board-certified, practicing adult nurse practitioner and provides primary care to formerly incarcerated men and women. As assistant professor, her primary teaching responsibilities are in the doctor of nursing practice programs with a focus on health assessment, health care business and finance, and doctoral project advisement. Her research interests include return on investment and cost analysis studies of nurse-managed health centers (NMHCs), patient satisfaction of NMHCs and the impact of aging on perceptions of health and health care utilization.


Steven Rothschild

Steven Rosthschild, MD, is a family physician, educator and researcher in the departments of Preventive Medicine and Family Medicine at Rush University. In addition to a 30-year clinical career providing primary medical care to the medically underserved, he is an established researcher focusing on health services research, chronic illness self-management and community- and team-based approaches to addressing health disparities. As an expert in community-based, participatory research, he has been an invited faculty member for the National Institutes of Health’s Summer Institute on the design and conduct of randomized clinical trials involving behavioral interventions, which was sponsored by the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. As a faculty member at Rush, he has been recognized by students for his teaching excellence and humanism. He is also the co-convener of Rush's interprofessionalism interest group, bringing together more than 30 clinicians and faculty from across the Medical Center to improve team-based education, research and patient care. Rothschild serves on the Chicago Board of Health, the advisory committee for the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship Program and the Health and Medicine Policy Research Group, where he is vice president.

Partners
  • Christina J. Manheimer, FNP-C, APRN – College of Nursing
  • Derek Lambert - senior director of development
  • Kathleen Delaney, PhD, PMH-NP, FAAN – professor, College of Nursing
  • Meeta Shah, MD - associate professor of emergency medicine
  • Rachel Smith, MBA - program manager, Social Determinants of Health
  • Sharon Gates, DSW - senior director, Student Diversity and Community Engagement
  • Teresa Berumen, Community Health Worker program coordinator
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