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Videos

Orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons at Rush pinpoint and treat the sources of spine, back and neck pain while offering the latest, most innovative nonsurgical and surgical treatment options.

Although roughly 80 percent of scoliosis patients are female, boys do get scoliosis and have the same symptoms as girls, according to Christopher DeWald, MD, an orthopedic spine surgeon with Rush University Medical Center.

John O'Toole, MD, a neurological spine surgeon at Rush describes how doctors from many different specialties collaborate to treat spine tumors at Rush University Medical Center.

John O'Toole, MD, a neurological spine surgeon with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois, discusses primary and metastatic spine and spinal cord tumors.

John O'Toole, MD, a neurological spine surgeon with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois, describes the symptoms of spine tumors.

Dr. John O'Toole, MD, a neurological spine surgeon at Rush describes spine tumor treatment at Rush University Medical Center.

Scoliosis doesn't cause pain or disability except in the most extreme cases. Usually, it's diagnosed after a doctor or family member notices an abnormal S-shaped curvature of the spine.

Braces have long been the standard of care for scoliosis, although braces today are far less cumbersome than the braces of a few decades ago.

For adults, surgery can help to relieve debilitating pain that affects quality of life, according to Christopher DeWald, MD, an orthopedic spine surgeon at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.