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Pediatric Referral Program

Rush University Children's Hospital remains open to all members of the medical staff to admit and manage the care of their own patients.

If you do not have admitting privileges at Rush, physicians at Rush will care for your patient and will communicate with you directly during and after your patient’s stay. They will then return the patient to your care after hospital discharge.

How to admit a patient

Admitting a patient to the service is as easy as making a phone call.

  • Call (312) NOW-RUSH (669-7874) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • We will collect basic demographic information on your patient.
  • A physician will then contact you to discuss the best way to get your patient the care he/she needs.

Your patient’s stay at Rush

  • During your patient's stay at Rush, a physician liaison is available to keep you apprised of significant changes in your patient’s care.
  • On the day of discharge, the physician will call you to discuss the hospital course and discharge recommendations.
  • Your patient will also receive a discharge summary.

Contact us

The team at Rush  University Children's Hospital looks forward to the privilege of caring for your patients. For more information, contact the General Pediatrics unit at (312) 942-5046 and ask to speak with a physician.

About Rush University Children’s Hospital

Rush University Children's Hospital allows pediatricians and other physicians who care for children to collaborate with hospital-based physicians to provide quality inpatient care, with access to more than 100 subspecialists. Hospitalist physicians at Rush communicate directly with referring physicians and provide patients with continuous, high-level care in a 120-bed, state-designated children's hospital.

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