It's How Medicine Should Be®

News

Research

June 27, 2017

The number of cancer clinical trials at Rush doubled last year — from around 30 in early 2015 to nearly 150 by the end of 2016. And the focus of the research has broadened.

June 23, 2017

A study has found that the gene mutation that puts many black people at risk for chronic kidney disease requires higher than normal levels of a protein called suPAR to trigger the onset and progression of the disease.

June 19, 2017

A Rush study shows for the first time how dying cells ensure they will be replaced, and suggests a new approach to shrinking cancerous tumors.

June 5, 2017

 Sarah Ailey PhD, APHN, is studying ways to improve social skills of people with intellectual disabilities in order to help them avoid harmful situations.

April 21, 2017

Two studies are using smart glasses to assess behavior of children with autism in order to find ways to enhance their interactions with others.     

March 6, 2017

A new international study co-led by a Rush University Medical Center researcher suggests that a drug starting through the pipeline could ameliorate or even eliminate the symptoms in most lupus sufferers.

February 6, 2017

Parkinson’s disease patients have different gut microbiomes than people without the disease. New research shows that those bacterial differences can trigger or accelerate the disease.

February 6, 2017

Hearing expert Valeriy Shafiro, PhD, studies ways to enhance cochlear implants for the hearing impaired.

December 12, 2016

New research shows that a protein biomarker for chronic kidney disease originates in the bone marrow, an important step towards earlier detection and prevention of chronic kidney disease. Because immature myeloid cells appear as a main source of circulating suPAR protein, stem cell transplants may prove to be a viable approach to treat suPAR-associated kidney disease.

November 23, 2016

Immunology expert Alan Landay, PhD, discusses how his research in HIV is yielding insights into diseases of normal aging and how to treat them.