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Clinical Services at Rush Frequently Asked Questions in Urology

Q: What are urologists?

A: Urologists focus on structural disorders within the urinary tract or kidneys and male reproductive organs. Urologists are physician surgeons who see patients in office settings and are trained to perform surgery when necessary.

Q: Do urologists only treat male patients?

A: While urologists typically treat male patients, they also treat female patients with urinary tract and kidney diseases and disorders. Urologists at Rush University Medical Center work collaboratively with specialists in obstetrics and gynecology to provide comprehensive care to female patients.

Q: When should I go to a urologist?

A: Male or female patients should visit a urologist if they are having problems with their urinary system, such as incontinence (bladder leakage or inability to control your bladder), difficulty urinating or pain when urinating. It is important to make an appointment with a urologist if you experience blood in your urine; recurrent urinary tract infections; poor bladder control; or pain possibly due to kidney stones. In addition, men in particular should visit a urologist if they are having problems with their reproductive system such as erectile dysfunction, male infertility or pain in the genital area. They should also see a urologist for annual prostate checks or if they are interested in a vasectomy.

Q: Why is it important to see a urologist for quality of life issues, such as erectile dysfunction?

A: Although it may be a difficult subject to broach, it is important to tell your doctor if you are experiencing erectile dysfunction (ED). ED can be an indication of other underlying health problems, including high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. In fact, ED may be the earliest indication of cardiovascular disease; ED may be present as early as three to four years before any cardiovascular problems are recognized. Urologists at Rush work closely with specialists in cardiology and endocrinology, among others, to address patients’ health issues that may be linked to ED, but not always recognized. Urologists at Rush understand the deeply personal nature of such issues and provide patients with compassionate, personalized care in a safe, judgment-free setting.
 





Contact Name
Department of Urology
Contact Phone
(888) 352-RUSH


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