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Quality at Rush
Rush Heart Quality Measures

Rush is committed to sharing quality data on our heart care and to continuing to add further measures of quality in the future. We currently have available data on the care for heart attack and heart failure.

Heart attack care

Heart failure care

Heart attack care

Core measure set

For a patient who is in a hospital because of a heart attack, this set of measures looks at whether that patient received the appropriate related drugs, education and testing, and whether these actions occurred within certain time frames. This measure indicates that 98 percent of patients treated for a heart attack at Rush receive these actions within the appropriate time frames.

The higher the score on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush scores lower, and therefore worse than the University HealthSystem Consortium median for academic medical centers.

What Rush is doing to monitor and improve patient care in this area
We always strive for best-in-class performance. When that does not happen, we convene a quality improvement team to identify the reasons why. We continue to analyze outliers to determine opportunities to improve our performance for care after heart attack.

Mortality rate

This measurement shows whether patients who enter a hospital for a heart attack are still alive 30 days after their initial admission to the hospital. This measure indicates that 14.7 percent of patients treated for a heart attack at Rush die within 30 days of their admission to the hospital.

Because some hospitals, such as academic medical centers like Rush, tend to take care of significantly sicker patients, the rate of mortality (or death) is adjusted to take into account how sick patients were before being admitted to the hospital. This rate is then referred to as risk adjusted.

The lower the score on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush scores similarly to the national average.

Readmission rate

This measurement shows whether patients who enter a hospital for a heart attack are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after an initial discharge. This measure indicates that 21.5 percent of patients treated for a heart attack at Rush were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of their initial discharge.

Because some hospitals, such as academic medical centers like Rush, tend to take care of significantly sicker patients, the rate of readmissions is adjusted to take into account how sick patients were before being admitted to the hospital. This rate is then referred to as risk adjusted.

The lower the score on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush scores similarly to the national average.

Emergency transfer time

During a heart attack, time is critical. Because of this, one quality measure that hospitals track is the amount of time it takes from arrival at a local emergency room to arrival at a second “receiving” hospital (via a transfer) with more advanced capabilities. The shorter the time, the better; this measure can indicate whether the receiving hospital has put in place processes to make a shorter time possible.

This measure is referred to as the “Median time from ED [emergency department] arrival at STEMI referral hospital to ED arrival at STEMI receiving hospital among transferred patients.” It shows that the median time for transfer from another hospital’s emergency department to Rush’s emergency department is 43.5 minutes. The national goal for this measure is a 60-minute transfer time between arrival at a referring hospital ED and arrival at the receiving hospital.

STEMI refers to "ST segment elevation myocardial infarction," which is what is commonly referred to as a major heart attack. Myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) occur when a coronary artery suddenly becomes at least partially blocked by a blood clot, causing at least some of the heart muscle being supplied by that artery to die (known as infarction). Heart attacks are divided into two types, according to their severity. A STEMI is the more severe type. In a STEMI, the coronary artery is completely blocked off by the blood clot; as a result, nearly all the heart muscle that is supplied by the affected artery starts to die.

The shorter the time on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush’s time is shorter, and therefore better than the national average. 

Door-to-balloon time

For patients having a heart attack, the time between when they enter the hospital and receive the recommended emergency treatment of an angioplasty is known as “door-to-balloon” time. This measure is sometimes also referred to as “time to PCI,” or percutaneous coronary intervention, which is another name for an angioplasty/stenting.

The standard set by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association is a door-to-balloon time of no more than 90 minutes. The shorter the time, the better; this measure can indicate whether the STEMI capable hospital has put in place processes to make a shorter time possible.

This measure is referred to as the “Median time from ED [emergency department] arrival at STEMI referral hospital to immediate PCI at STEMI receiving hospital among transferred patients.” It shows that the median time from emergency department arrival at the first hospital to receiving PCI at the STEMI receiving facility (in this case, Rush) among transferred patients is 85 minutes. The national goal for this composite time is 120 minutes.

The shorter the time on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush’s time is shorter, and therefore better than the national average.

Heart failure care

Heart failure core measure set

For a patient who is in a hospital because of heart failure, this set of measures looks at whether that patient received the appropriate related drugs, education and testing, and whether these actions occurred within certain time frames. This measure indicates that 98.6 percent of patients treated for heart failure at Rush receive these actions within the appropriate time frames.

The higher the score on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush scores higher, and therefore better than the University HealthSystem Consortium median for academic medical centers.

Heart failure mortality (deaths)

This measurement shows whether patients who enter a hospital for heart failure are still alive 30 days after their initial admission to the hospital. This measure indicates that 7.3 percent of patients treated for heart failure at Rush die within 30 days of their admission to the hospital.

Because some hospitals, such as academic medical centers like Rush, tend to take care of significantly sicker patients, the rate of mortality (or death) is adjusted to take into account how sick patients were before being admitted to the hospital. This rate is then referred to as risk adjusted.

The lower the score on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush scores lower, and therefore better than the national average.

Heart failure readmissions

This measurement shows whether patients who enter a hospital for heart failure are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after an initial discharge. This measure indicates that 25.9 percent of patients treated for heart failure at Rush were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of their initial discharge.

Because some hospitals, such as academic medical centers like Rush, tend to take care of significantly sicker patients, the rate of readmissions is adjusted to take into account how sick patients were before being admitted to the hospital. This rate is then referred to as risk adjusted.

The lower the score on this measure, the better. For this measure, Rush scores similarly to the national average.


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Rush Heart Quality Measures

   
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