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Health Information In the News: Discover Rush Fall 2012

 Rush's Tower sets green milestone

Rush University Medical Center's innovative new hospital building, the Tower, which opened in January, earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification, making it the largest new-construction health care building in the world to be given that distinction. It is the only full-service green hospital in Chicago.

The recognition is given by the U.S. Green Building Council and verified by the Green Building Certification Institute.

Hundreds of energy-saving ideas were incorporated into the planning, construction and design of the Tower, which scored highly in the LEED point system in energy efficiency, lighting control, water conservation and material choices, as well as a variety of other features.

"From the outset of our facilities planning, we made a commitment to sustainability because, in the long run, it is good for our patients, our employees and the entire community," says Peter Butler, president and chief operating officer of Rush.

Daily physical activity may reduce Alzheimer's risk

Don't have the desire to run a marathon? Run some errands instead.

Many ordinary activities, such as cooking, playing cards, meeting with friends and washing dishes, may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline even in older adults, according to a new study by researchers from Rush University Medical Center. The study is highlighted in an article in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The research found that people who ranked in the bottom 10 percent in daily physical activity were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's disease as people in the top 10 percent. In addition, people in the bottom 10 percent of physical activity intensity were almost three times more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than people in the top 1 percent.

"These results provide support for efforts to encourage all types of physical activity, even in very old adults who might not be able to participate in formal exercise but can still benefit from a more active lifestyle," says Aron Buchman, MD, lead author of the study.

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Discover Rush Fall 2012
In the News: Discover Rush Fall 2012

   
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