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Rush Physician May/June 2011 Spotlight

The Electrophysiology Program at Rush

The Rush Electrophysiology Program, one of the busiest such programs in the Chicago area, provides comprehensive diagnostic and treatment options for patients with arrhythmias and congestive heart failure.  

Leading-Edge Treatments
Many of these options — including the latest advances in diagnostic and interventional electrophysiology, cardiac imaging and implantable cardiac device technologies — stem from the program's history of innovation. Long considered leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, electrophysiology specialists at Rush implanted one of the world's first indwelling cardiac pacemakers in 1965; in 2000, they were among the first in Illinois to implant a biventricular pacemaker. Today, the program's services include the following:

  • Electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) tests
  • Monitoring of heart rhythms by telephone, Holter monitor or 30-day event recorder
  • Complete electrophysiologic testing of the heart
  • Catheter ablation for treatment of heart rhythm disturbances such as ventricular tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation
  • Implantation of monitors for recurrent syncope or palpitations of the heart
  • Monitoring of implantable devices, including pacemakers, defibrillators and biventricular pacemakers
  • Implantation of defibrillators
  • Implantation of cardiac resynchronization devices for treatment of heart failure

Continuing Innovation
The electrophysiology team at Rush continues to expand and improve these options. Recently, they began using the Sensei Robotic Catheter System, a new way to treat arrhythmias.

Instead of standing over the patient and manipulating a catheter by hand, physicians using this system sit at a remote workstation and position the catheter by observing it on a monitor while they operate a joystick. Kousik Krishnan, MD, director of the Arrhythmia Device Clinic, says the robotic system allows physicians to more precisely target and eliminate abnormal, arrhythmia-causing tissues without damaging the heart wall.

"You can move the catheter millimeter by millimeter in the heart to the exact place you want it to go," he says. "This advances the way we perform complex cardiac procedures, especially for atrial fibrillation." 

Participating Physicians
Participating physicians include Richard G. Trohman, MD, director of Electrophysiology, Arrhythmia and Pacemaker Services at Rush; Kousik Krishnan, MD, director of the Arrhythmia Device Clinic; and Christopher Madias, MD, an electrophysiologist.

For more information or to refer a patient, call (312) 563-4375.


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Rush Physician May/June 2011 Spotlight
Rush Physician May/June 2011


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