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Health Information To Your Health: Coping With Holiday Stress

Santa Claus has a major toy building operation to oversee at the North Pole and an impossible delivery schedule to keep. Still, Kris Kringle finds a way to remain jolly.

Perhaps that's because he uses one of the tips Ira Halper, MD, director of the Cognitive Therapy Center in the Department of Psychiatry at Rush University Medical Center, recommends for coping with holiday stress. Santa Claus makes a list — and even checks it twice — to keep track of who's naughty and nice. Lists are a great way for any of us to stay organized while contending with last-minute shopping, crowds, holiday travel, financial strain and dysfunctional family dynamics.

With a lot more on our plates besides turkey and stuffing, it's easy for even the most jovial among us to become frazzled. And there is no shortage of negative ways to cope: Alcohol is plentiful and overeating is easy. But positive ways to manage stress aren’t difficult to implement, either, so Halper recommends giving the following a try:

Stay Organized
With so much to keep track of, try the "ABC" list: "A" consists of tasks that must get done today, "B" goals are to be done within two or three days and "C" within a week. A set of clear goals will help you avoid becoming overwhelmed, which can happen if you suddenly forget something on a schedule that only exists in your head.

Try Relaxation Techniques
  • Diaphragmatic breathing — While in a comfortable position, slowly inhale through your nose while focusing on expanding the abdomen rather than the chest. Then slowly exhale through your mouth and repeat the process for at least 10 minutes. Also, be aware of your breathing throughout the day. When stressed, we tend to take shallow breaths through our chest, disrupting the balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide that is necessary for being in a relaxed state.
  • Muscle relaxation — Tense up a muscle and hold for eight to 10 seconds before releasing. Apply this to all major muscle groups. Releasing the tension brings a feeling of relaxation. With practice, you can use this technique throughout the day whenever you notice an onset of physical tension.
Reframe Your Thoughts
"If you can’t afford as many meals as usual, are family and friends really going to think poorly of you? Often, the realization that your worst nightmare isn't likely to come true is enough to alleviate the stress," Halper says. "And if somebody does think poorly of you because there isn't an elaborate spread, is that person really a good friend?"

Being mindful of your thoughts can be a powerful tool for regulating your mood. Often, negative thinking is unfounded. If a negative event does occur, use the same type of self-talk to put it in perspective. If you dread seeing your in-laws every year and they validate that feeling with their behavior, remind yourself that you only have control over your own actions, their behavior is a reflection of themselves and not you, and the event won't last forever.

It's a technique that can take some practice, and a cognitive-behavioral therapist such as Halper can help if you're finding it tough to manage stress on your own and are feeling overwhelmed. It can be helpful for acute or chronic stress.
More Information at Your Fingertips:
  • Everyone experiences stress, but we each handle it in different ways. Join physicians from Rush at a free event on Wednesday, Dec. 8, from 6 to 8 p.m. to learn how managing stress, exercising and adopting healthier eating habits can make a significant improvement on overall well-being. To register or for more information, call (888) 352-RUSH (7874).
  • Ira Halper, MD, and his colleagues at the Cognitive Therapy Center were pioneers in the combined use of cognitive therapy and pharmacologic treatment. A variety of cognitive and behavioral strategies are employed to help the individual recognize the connection between thoughts, emotions and behavior and substitute negative beliefs with more useful interpretations.
  • Looking for a doctor? Call toll free: 888 352-RUSH (888 352-7874)
  • Stay in touch with Rush with Rush Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and more.

Please note: All physicians featured in Discover Rush Online are on the medical faculty of Rush University Medical Center. Some of the physicians featured are in private practice and, as independent practitioners, are not agents or employees of Rush University Medical Center.

If you enjoyed this article and are not already a subscriber, subscribe today to Discover Rush Online. You'll receive health information, breaking medical news and helpful tips for maintaining your health each month via e-mail.

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To Your Health: Coping With Holiday Stress

   
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