Rush Medical Center Home Page Information for healthcare Professionals Rush University
FIND A DOCTOR
PATIENT & VISTOR SERVICES
HEALTH INFORMATION
CLINICAL SERVICES
EVENTS & CLASSES
RUSH NEWS ROOM
CLINICAL TRIALS
RESEARCH AT RUSH
NURSING AT RUSH
WORK AT RUSH
GIVING TO RUSH

Bookmark This Page
Health Information Vitamins

You Might Just Need that Multivitamin
Healthy diets aren't always enough

 

You exercise. You eat right. And you don't go wild with the coffee and cocktails.

But even if you're the exemplar of healthy living, you might want to consider working a multivitamin into your daily routine. Despite your best efforts, you may not be getting enough of the nutrients you need.

"Vitamins are basically like oil in the car," says Sohrab Mobarhan, MD, a gastroenterologist with Rush University Medical Center who studies the effects of nutrition on disease. "If you don't have enough of it, you burn your engine."

People who aren't exposed to enough sunlight, for example, may not get enough vitamin D, which is crucial for calcium absorption and bone growth. And aging-related changes in our stomachs may lead to inadequate absorption of vitamin B12, which helps maintain healthy nerve cells and red blood cells.

Not eating enough fresh fruits and vegetables, meanwhile, can deprive you of sufficient amounts of folate, which is particularly important during pregnancy and infancy. It helps create DNA and RNA – the building blocks of cells – and our bodies need it to make normal red blood cells.

People who need to be particularly careful about getting enough vitamins include pregnant women and those with conditions like inflammatory bowel disease that may interfere with proper vitamin absorption.

But how do you know if you're not getting the vitamins you need? "The problem with vitamin deficiency is that many times people may just feel tired and not realize they have a vitamin deficiency," Mobarhan says.

There's no evidence that taking a daily vitamin is harmful, Mobarhan says, but you don't want to overdo it, either. Excess amounts of folate and vitamins A, D and E, for example, can be hazardous to your health.

"One has to be very careful with those vitamins," Mobarhan says, "and not take more than the recommended daily allowance."


More Information at Your Fingertips:


Please note: All physicians featured in Discover Rush Online are on the medical faculty of Rush University Medical Center. Some of the physicians featured are in private practice and, as independent practitioners, are not agents or employees of Rush University Medical Center.

If you enjoyed this article and are not already a subscriber, subscribe today to Discover Rush Online. You'll receive health information, breaking medical news and helpful tips for maintaining your health each month via e-mail.

 

Looking for More Health Information?

Visit Discover Rush's Web Resource page to find articles on health topics and recent health news from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. You will also find many helpful links to other areas of our site.

Looking for a Doctor?

Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois, is a leader in caring for people of all ages, from newborns through older adults.

Just phone (888) 352-RUSH or (888) 352-7874 for help finding the Rush doctor who's right for you.



 

Promotional Information

E-newsletter
E-newsletter archive
Vitamins

   
Find a Doctor | Patient & Visitor Services | Health Information
Clinical Services | Events & Classes | Rush News Room | Clinical Trials
Research At Rush
Disclaimer | Privacy Statement | Site Map

© Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois