It's How Medicine Should Be®

Font Size:

-A +A

Translate

French German Italian Portuguese Russian

Aron Buchman, MD

Aron S. Buchman, MD, is an associate professor in the Department of Neurological Sciences at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Buchman received the degree of bachelor of science, cum laude, from Loyola University of Chicago in 1977. He was a Patinkin Fellow and spent 1979-80 studying medical ethics in Israel at the Regensberg Institute. He earned his doctorate in medicine from Chicago Medical School/University of Health Sciences in 1982. Following internship in internal medicine at Brookdale Hospital in New York, Buchman returned to Rush for residency training in neurology and a fellowship in movement disorders and clinical neuropharmacology, which he completed in 1987.

Buchman received additional fellowship training in clinical electrophysiology and neuromuscular diseases at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver General Hospital in 1987-88. Buchman received board certification in neurology in 1988 and from the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine in 1989. He received added certification in clinical neurophysiology in 1994.

Buchman served as director of the EMG Laboratory at Rush from 1988 to 1996 and acting director of the Section on Neuromuscular Diseases in 1997. He received a career development award from the NINDS/NIH from 1994-99 for his work that investigated motor control and motor unit recruitment. Buchman was a research fellow at the NeuroMuscular Research Center at Boston University from 1992-95. He was a visiting scientist in the Department of Applied Mathematics at the Weizmann Institute of Science from 1995-97.

Buchman’s research interests include the effects of aging on the motor system. More recently his research has focused on identifying the structural basis of clinical frailty in older persons, exploring the pathologic indices linking risk factors to the development of frailty so as to provide a conceptual basis for the development and testing of interventions to reduce the burden of this common syndrome in older adults.